Thai cuisine is well known for its spiciness, with Som Tam (a spicy papaya salad) being a famous example. The secret to Thai food is a balance of five flavours: sour, sweet, salty, bitter, and spicy. Some Thai dishes have a careful blend of all these tantalizing tastes. Others are served with something to help deal with the overpowering spiciness. For example, Tom Yum Goong, which is sour and spicy often paired with an omelette or rice. 

As well as many herbs and spices used in Thai food, fish sauce is often used in a similar way salt is, as it mellows the taste. This means vegetarians will have to take this into account when choosing from our menu, simply ask your server if the dish you are ordering contains fish sauce. As all our dishes are cooked fresh to order you can ask for your dish to be prepared without fish sauce

Here at Jino’s we have a great variety of Thai food for you to try, starters, main dishes and desserts. 

THAI CURRY AND SOUP

Traditionally, Thai meals are served family style, with all diners sharing entrees, a Thai curry or soup is usually ordered with a meal. The consistency of each Thai curry varies widely, with some curries arguably classifiable as soups like our Jungle Curry. However, most Thai curries are coconut milk-based and some are spicier than others. Gaeng Massaman, is a mild, peanut and potato curry; Gaeng Kiaw Wan (Thai green curry) is a curry of medium thickness and spiciness, Tom Kha, a mild coconut soup, blurs the lines between soup and curry, while Tom Yam Kung, a quintessential Thai soup, is often blisteringly hot. However, you can choose how spicy you want your dish. Just ask your server what degree of spiciness you would prefer

RICE

Rice is the staple food for Thais, eaten with most meals, from breakfast to dessert. In fact, in Thai language, if you say you are hungry or you want to eat you literally say “I want to eat rice.” It should be unsurprising to learn then that Thailand is the world’s largest exporter of rice and that Thai rice includes more than one strain, each of which has its own characteristic and flavor. The most esteemed Thai rice is Jasmine Rice, sweet-smelling long-grain rice that is indigenous to Thailand. Served steamed, jasmine rice is the finest rice to accompany most dishes, including Thai curries.

STIR FRY

Wok stir frying is a fast, exciting and energetic cooking technique that is absolutely perfect for preparing a tasty meal quickly. Stir frying is an ancient Chinese technique adapted by the Thai people to create an array of delicious favorites. Wok cooking offers a unique flavour and distinctive qualities: the fast and furious heat – the short cooking time – allow meats and vegetables to cook quickly, preserving their shape, texture, colour and nutritional benefits. The round shape of the wok, along with the heat source and its direction, influence the distribution of liquids in the cooking space, as well as the creation of steam and particle-rich vapors that give the food its exceptional taste.

THAI NOODLES

Noodles are more frequently served and eaten at street stalls that specialize in Thai noodle dishes. Our most popular dish is Pad Thai. Noodles come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, including “small” (sen lek), “large” (sen yai), angel hair (sen mee), and x-large (gway tiow). Most Thai noodles are made of rice, though egg noodles (ba mee) and mungbean based glass noodles are also common. Here at Jino’s we use rice noodles

THAI SALAD OR YAM

A Thai salad is often one of the spiciest Thai dishes and is frequently ordered as one of the many communal dishes in a meal. A Thai salad is generally made of raw vegetables mixed with chili, lime, and fish sauce, though some, such as Yam Neua (Thai beef salad). The most internationally recognized Thai salad, Som Tam is technically a dish of Lao origin, and is most popular in Northeastern Thailand, where it is prepared in a manner that would wreak havoc on the stomach of an unsuspecting visitor unaccustomed to real spicy Thai food. Som Tam consists primarily of shredded papaya and is often served with grilled chicken (gai yang). 

THAI DESSERTS

Thai people love to eat dessert. This includes both traditional Thai desserts as well as western fare, including cakes and ice cream. Traditional Thai desserts are quite sweet, made predominately from various combinations of rice, coconut milk, and sugar, along with a few seemingly less common dessert ingredients, such as sweet corn or kidney beans. Some egg based Thai desserts trace their history back to the influence of Portuguese missionaries (who also introduced the chili!)